Bingo: A Review Game for PowerPoint

Bingo is a common game to use in the language learning classroom, especially Word Bingo.

This PowerPoint version of Bingo allows you to prepare all your words before class and display a large version of a Bingo grid to your class.

I originally wrote an article about Bingo in 2014 and I wanted to remake the template and provide some additional resources to go along with it.

Download the PowerPoint Bingo template

Bingo - Title SlideBingo - Menu Screen

The template contains 2 slides – a title slide and a Bingo card slide. There are 24 numbers on the Bingo card slide with a free square symbolized by a star. Under each of the numbers, there is a hidden word which is added by the teacher.

You can also copy the Bingo card slide into your own presentation

  • Right-click on the slide and click on copy
  • Change the window to your new template by clicking on the file open on the taskbar
  • Right-click in the slide view pane on the left-hand side of your current presentation and click on paste (keep source formatting).

The new board is a bit more colorful and uses high contrasting colors to make it easier for students to read. There are also five different colored bingo balls: red, orange, green, blue and purple. While you can play Bingo under a central theme (in my examples, I will be using adjectives), you can also assign different categories or units to review to each color.

Editing the Template

Watch the tutorial video below or read through the notes for information on how to edit the template.

Video tutorial on how to edit the template.
The video run-time is 2 minutes and 19 seconds.
  • Download and open the template.
  • Select the Bingo card slide.
  • Go the editing section of the home ribbon.
  • Click on select and choose the selection pane. The selection pane will open on the right-hand side of the screen.
  • Click on the hide all button at the top of the selection pane. All the objects on the screen will disappear.
  • Scroll down the selection pane and find the group called WORDS.
  • Click on the eye symbol next to WORDS to reveal the text boxes.
  • Add a word to each of the boxes.
  • When you have added all your words, return to the selection pane and click show all. All the objects will appear.
  • The template is now ready to use in class.

Playing the Game

There are two ways that this PowerPoint template could be played.

PowerPoint Template Only

Bingo - Lines.png

Winning lines for PowerPoint Bingo

With a small class, the template can be played by itself. Students choose a number and try to make a row of five squares in any direction.

PowerPoint Template with Bingo Cards

Bingo - Bingo Card.PNG

Click on the Bingo Card to download a PDF template.

With larger classes, whether in teams or as individual players, you may find that it is easier to use individual Bingo cards. Students can write their own cards and choose where to place their own numbers. The students then call out the numbers they want from the PowerPoint template.

In both cases, the general rules of play are the same.

  • Decide whether your students will play as individuals, in groups or teams, or as a class. This will largely depend on your class size.
  • If you are using Bingo cards, hand them out to students are ask them to write numbers 1 to 24 in a random way on their paper. Once the students have prepared their cards, you can begin the game.
  • Go to the slideshow ribbon and start the presentation.
  • The title screen of the game will appear. Left-click to move to the next slide and to start the game.
  • Ask a student at random to choose the first number.
  • Click on the square to reveal the word hidden beneath.
  • The students should make a sentence with the word before they can claim the square.
  • Once a sentence has been offered, all the students can cross the chosen number out on their Bingo card.
  • The students need to make a row of five squares either on the PowerPoint template or on their Bingo card handout.
  • When a student has crossed out five squares, they should shout “Bingo!”

Adapting the Template

You can adapt the template and use it as many times as you need.

Simply left-click on a numbered square and drag it to a new location on the PowerPoint Bingo card slide. to reorder

Just be sure that the numbered squares completely cover the text boxes beneath them

That’s it! I hope you enjoy playing Bingo!

Do you have any other suggestions for playing Bingo in the classroom? Please leave a comment if you have any ideas you would like to share or if you have any questions about the template.

Alternatively, you can send me a message on my Facebook page or on Twitter.

Thanks for reading and take care!


This version of Bingo was designed with Microsoft PowerPoint 2016. Animations and sounds may differ when opened in other presentation software.

Microsoft® Office® is a copyrighted product of the Microsoft® corporation. All images are for educational purposes only.

Sound effects used in Family Feud are available for download at SoundBible.com.
Electronic Chime sound effect recorded by KevanGC. Used under a public domain license.
A Tone sound effect recorded by His Self. Used under a public domain license.


You may also like to read:

Bingo 2.0 - link image

Bingo can be fun as well as a valuable learning experience. This was the first Bingo post I wrote back in 2014. In this article, I gave some tips and suggestions for how you can create your own interactive PowerPoint Bingo card.

 

hearts-bingo-featured-imageA version of Bingo created for Valentine’s Day.
The goal is for students to make a horizontal (left to right), vertical (top to bottom) or diagonal (corner to corner) line of five hearts. If a student makes a line of five hearts, they should shout ‘BINGO!’ This activity is suitable for both large and small classes.

2 thoughts on “Bingo: A Review Game for PowerPoint

  1. Hi Alison, I clicked on both the download link and the images. The file I downloaded from the site contains both the title slide and the menu screen. Did you download it recently? There was an incorrect link when the article was first posted, but it was corrected within a few minutes of being on the site. Try again and let me know what happens. Regards, T.

    Like

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